Additional ResourcesAdditional Resources

A Place at the Table: Participating in Community Building
http://www.cas.usf.edu/lis/a-librarian-at-every-table/libraries.html
  (accessed Feb. 23/08)

This website by Kathleen de la Peña McCook, Distinguished University Professor of Library and Information Science, University of South Florida, provides a discussion of comprehensive community collaboration, service integration and the national movement on building community.


Asset Based Community Development Institute
(accessed Feb. 23/08)
www.sesp.northwestern.edu/abcd

The Asset-Based Community Development Institute (ABCD), established in 1995 by the Community Development Program at Northwestern University's Institute for Policy Research, is built upon three decades of community development research by John Kretzmann and John L. McKnight.


Canadian Rural Partnership: Asset Mapping: A handbook
http://www.rural.gc.ca/conference/documents/mapping_e.phtml  (accessed Feb. 23/08)

Developed by Tony Fuller, Denyse Guy and Carolyn Pletsch, this handbook describes three possible approaches to community asset mapping within rural communities. Within this context,, assets are defined as popularly recognized attributes and advantages of a community. They are considered essential for the maintenance of rural life and vital for the sustainability of the economy, society and environment in rural Canada.

 

City of Calgary Community Assessment Handbook.
www.calgary.ca. Click on City Hall/

Business Units/Community and Neighbourhood Services/Publications, Guides and Directories, then scroll down the left panel and click on Community Assessment Handbook. (accessed Feb. 23/08)

This manual describes the key elements and process for conducting a community assessment from beginning to end. It provides a framework and tools for actively learning about a community's needs and strengths and then setting priorities.   


Community Information and Services for Australians

www.community.gov.au
(click on community development) (accessed Feb. 23/08)

This site contains many links to sources of information on community development, building social capital, sustainable communities, community networking, business and community partnerships. 


Community Empowerment Training Modules by Phil Bartle, Ph.D.
http://www.scn.org/cmp/modules/a-mod.htm
(accessed Feb. 23/08)

These training modules contain basic texts, model forms, short handouts for workshops, and notes for trainers. Each module has a single topic, with different documents in it for different actors or purposes.


Community Tool Box

http://ctb.ku.edu
(accessed Feb. 23/08)

The Community Tool Box is the world's largest resource for free information on essential skills for building healthy communities. It offers over 7,000 pages of practical guidance in creating change and improvement


Connecticut
Assets Network: Assets Library Glossary
http://www.ctassets.org/ctasset_libraryglossary.htm
(accessed Jan 11/08)


From the Ground Up: An Organizing Handbook for Healthy Communities

www.healthycommunities.on.ca/publications
(accessed Feb. 23/08)

This handbook was written by staff and volunteers of the Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition as a guide to individuals, groups and coalitions who want to start a Healthy Community initiative in their community. It gives information and tips on getting started, assessing community needs and assets, organizational development, planning, communication, leadership, partnerships, fundraising, evaluation and more. A glossary of terms, samples of forms and documents, and references for further information are also provided.


Tamarack: An Institute for Community Engagement - Learning Centre
. http://tamarackcommunity.ca/g3.php )accessed Feb. 23/08)

The Learning Centre, established in 2003, is designed to create a fluid, creative system of documenting community building activity and delivering this learning to organizations. The centre has a threefold purpose: to broadly disseminate knowledge gathered through research and practical experience; to help communities increase their power through learning; and to generate knowledge about community engagement so as to advance the field.


Wilder Collaboration Factors Inventory

http://surveys.wilder.org/public_cfi/index.php (accessed Feb. 23/08)

This inventory was designed as a tool for assessing the factors that influence the success of a collaboration. Twenty such factors have been identified, and you will be provided with summary scores for each of these factors upon completion of the inventory.

 

 

 

 

Powered by Drupal, an open source content management system
Computer Squad